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Attachment to God as a source of struggle and strength: A prospective study exploring Christiansí relationship with God, coping with negative events, and wellbeing.

Ms. Sarah Calvert

Theory and evidence suggest that an individual’s faith relationship with God can function as an attachment relationship. Attachment theory may therefore provide a useful framework for understanding religious individuals’ experiences of their relationship with God and the associations between this relationship and their mental health. One of the key mechanisms through which attachment relationships influence mental health is via the process of affect-regulation, particularly when experiencing negative events.

Conflict of Interest: None disclosed
Recorded: Sydney, Australia, July 2008

Sarah Calvert
Sarah Calvert
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VideoAttachment to God as a source of struggle and strength: A prospective study exploring Christiansí relationship with God, coping with negative events, and wellbeing.Sarah Calvert25'15"
icon mp3.gifAttachment to God as a source of struggle and strength: A prospective study exploring Christiansí relationship with God, coping with negative events, and wellbeing.Sarah Calvert 


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Ms. Sarah Calvert

Sarah Calvert is a clinical psychology student at Massey University, New Zealand, currently working toward her PhD. She is interested in how the spiritual and psychological aspects of people's lives and faith inter-relate and influence each other. Having seen first-hand the potential for the spiritual dimension to provide both a powerful source of strength and wellbeing, but also a significant source of distress, she hopes to help raise awareness of the need to assess and incorporate this area in therapy. Her PhD is thus focused on the way in which a core dimension of spirituality – people’s experience of their relationship with God – interacts with their well-being, particularly in times of adversity.

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