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The effect of Ketamine on striatal functional connectivity as a model for risk for psychosis.

Orwa Dandash

Ketamine is a potent antagonist of the N-methyld-aspartate receptor that induces positive psychotic symptoms in healthy individuals reminiscent of those seen in people with schizophrenia. Ketamine is believed to act by imposing a broad modulatory effect on brain networks, particularly cortico-striatothalamic circuitry. To investigate the effect of a sub-anaesthetic dose of ketamine on the resting-state functional connectivity of dorsal and ventral corticostriatal circuits, structures that have strongly been implicated in the emergence of psychotic symptoms, and to characterize the symptom correlates of putative changes in cortico-striato-thalamic functional connectivity induced by ketamine infusion.  

12th Biennial Australasian Schizophrenia Conference
13-14 May 2013 Melbourne, Australia.
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Orwa Dandash

Dr. Dandash is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Monash Clinical and Imaging Neuroscience and the Melbourne Neuropsychiatry Centre. Orwa’s primary research focuses on understanding the neurochemical disturbances that underlie psychosis and their impact on large-scale functional brain networks. Orwa has developed an interest in targeting neural dysfunctions that may underlie different psychiatric disorders including depression, mania and schizophrenia. He is currently working on non-invasive applications to reverse some of the neural dysfunctions that underlie cognitive deficits in schizophrenia.

Co-authors: Ben Harrison, Ram Adapa, Raphael Gaillard, Francesco Giorlando, Paul Fletcher, Alex Fornito
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