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Can choir singing reduce depression and increase quality of life in middle aged people? A research project with qEEG testing

Kirstin Robertson-Gillam

Midlife depression could be a significant precursor to later life limitations. Psychosocial efforts to reduce target symptoms of chronic somatic and mental health problems may lead to a decrease in lowered quality of life. Midlife is a powerful time for the expression of human potential because it combines the capacity for insightful reflection with a powerful desire to create meaning in life. The current study examined whether symptoms of depression, traumatic stress and anxiety in middle age can be ameliorated through a choir program. 

Thirty-two community dwelling middle aged volunteers were tested for depression, post traumatic stress, wellbeing and quality of life before and after the intervention of choir singing. A mixed methods quasi-experimental design was used in which an experimental choir group of twenty one participants was compared to a wait list control group of eleven subjects after random selection. Nine participants from the choir were randomly selected for quantum electronencephalogram testing (qEEG) pre and post the intervention. 

WORLD DREAMING: WORLD CONGRESS FOR PSYCHOTHERAPY
24-28 August 2011 Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre
Darling Harbour, Australia.
Visit The World Council for Psychotherapy at [http://www.worldpsyche.org

Kirstin Robertson-Gillam
Kirstin Robertson-Gillam
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VideoCan choir singing reduce depression and increase quality of life in middle aged people? A research project with qEEG testingKirstin Robertson-Gillam14'48"
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Kirstin Robertson-Gillam

Kirstin is a registered general and midwifery nurse, a Registered Music Therapist and registered psychotherapist, Tier 1 WorkCover provider. She holds a PhD  MA(Hons), Bachelor of Arts  (psychology and ethnomusicology), a Masters in Counselling, and a Masters Honours degree  in Music Therapy Research and is a lecturer at the University of Western Sydney. As a music therapist, Kirstin has extensive experience in disabilities, palliative care and  mental health and has pioneered many positions which are still running today in NSW  across these fields. Kirstin was on the organising committee for the first music therapy course in NSW at  UTS, has been an instrumental member of the AMTA National Council, National Education Committee, three-time Chairperson of the NSW AMTA Branch, and has taught  as a casual lecturer at UTS and UWS Nordo" Robbins course over her illustrious career. 
 
To add to this, Kirstin is a regular conference presenter, article and book writer (in both  English and Japanese!) Kirstin currently combines her music therapy practice with psychotherapy counselling as  a private practitioner in North-West Sydney. Her experience in the mental health field is where her current Choir Therapy program is based, having worked first as a nurse in  this field and then as a music therapist and counsellor. Her MA (Hons) in Music Therapy  Research researched the e"ectiveness of choir singing for reducing depression in people with severe dementia, and her PhD researched the e"ects of her Choir  Therapy Program on depression in middle aged community dwellings adults. Within this study, Kirstin assisted Dr Leon Petchovsky in a small trial (N=9), using QEEG technology  for assessing brain changes as the result of choir therapy program. 
View Krisin publications page at http://www.kirstinrg.com/MyPublications.html

 

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