Live WebinarsPractice of PsychotherapyThe Internet in PracticeGroup TherapyJungian AnalysisThe Conversational ModelSelf PsychologyNotions of SelfBrief Interpersonal Therapies Dialectical Behaviour TherapyCognitive Behavioural TherapyAccept. & Commit. TherapyProcess Oriented PsychologyNarrative TherapyPositive PsychotherapyGestalt TherapyReality Therapy PsychoanalysisCounsellingAttachmentFamily TherapyCouple Therapy Child and AdolescentEMDRBody Oriented TherapiesTranspersonal PsychotherapyAdvances in NeurosciencePsychopharmacologyGeneral Practice PhenomenologyAppreciative InquiryDreams and DreamingShamanic HealingArt TherapyMindfulnessYoga and TherapyExistential TherapyPsychosophyRefugee TraumaCross-Cultural ApproachesIndigenous CultureTestimonial TherapyReligion and SpiritualityKinesiologyAcupunctureExercise and Mental HealthHospitalisationNurses & Mental HealthSocial WorkForensic psychologyPatient & Client PerspectiveEthicsPhilosophy and the mindTributesEditors ReviewResources

Turbulence at Heart: What a Linguist learned about Language from the Psychotherapist's 'Grammar of Empathy'

A/Prof. David G. Butt

In over 10 years of collaboration between psychotherapists working with the 'Conversational Model' (CM: Meares 2005) and Systemic Functional linguists (Webster 2015), the central purpose of our research (including an NHMRC project) was to make explicit the modes of talk which brought about change between traumatised patients (BPD) and their therapists. From the point of view of the linguists, the core language principles that emerged aligned in name and function with clinical ideas which themselves have drawn increasing emphasis from practitioners in the CM (Meares 2012; and Meares et al. 2012). These principles might be referred to as 'cohesion' and 'construal in context'. These terms, as findings, are outlined in this talk. The methods of analysis in the research included the detailed comparison of critical transitions in patient and therapist interactions, using transcripts marked by therapists for clinical significance (although with the potential to be construed in different ways). Details of this method are illustrated through examples (Butt, Moore, and Henderson-Brooks 2012). What concerns me most in this talk, however, is the degree to which the linguist's view of language was itself renewed within a biological and pragmatist framework of the "self" (Meares 2012). 

ISSTD Australia/New Zealand | Regional Conference
27-29 November 2015 | The Westin Sydney, Australia
Visit ISSTD: www.isst-d.org

David G. Butt
David G. Butt
  more about this speaker
  other talks by the speaker

ISSTD
XShare
Click on a link above to share this page with your networking site.

Media     

TITLE SPEAKER DURATION
VideoTurbulence at Heart: What a Linguist learned about Language from the Psychotherapist's 'Grammar of Empathy'David G. Butt20'49"
icon pdf.gifTurbulence at Heart: What a Linguist learned about Language from the Psychotherapist's 'Grammar of Empathy'David G. Butt 
icon mp3.gifTurbulence at Heart: What a Linguist learned about Language from the Psychotherapist's 'Grammar of Empathy'David G. Butt 


Top of page

A/Prof. David G. Butt

A/Professor David. G. Butt, Linguistics; Director, Centre for Language in Social Life, Faculty of Human Sciences, Macquarie University, NSW, Australia.

Top of page
Subscribers
Login Here
Email
Password
Subscribe
Now
BENEFIT from
UNLIMITED ACCESS to our
GROWING VIDEO LIBRARY
 
 
 
$19.95 - Unlimited Access
 
 
 
$99.75 - Save 1 Month
 
 
 
$149.95 - Save 3 Months
Australia Society for Psychological MedicineANZAPWorld Council for PyschtherapyPACFABrisbane Institute of Strength Base PraticeISHHR - International Society for Health and Human RightWAS - World Association for Sexual HealthMissing of HopeAABCAPSTARTTSANSA